CD REVIEW: Passion “Here For You”

***Disclaimer – Church Music Today’s review of Passion:  Here For You is based primarily on its usefulness in the local church ministry setting.  We have focused on three primary areas in undertaking this review (in this order):  #1 – biblical / lyrical faithfulness, #2 – basic usefulness in a local church service (sing-ability / format), and lastly, #3 – overall musical excellence (music, production, & arrangement).

1.  HERE FOR YOU (title cut) Sung by Chris Tomlin; Writers: Matt Maher, Matt Redman, Tim Wanstall, & Jesse Reeves Biblical References:  Exodus 15:11, Isaiah 42:5, Psalm 33:1, 145:19, Matthew 3:11, Ephesians 2:4-5, Hebrews 4:13 Lead Sheet/Super Chart: available via LifeWayWorship.Com Theme:  An anthem of praise to God, A song of welcome and worship Format: Verses 1 & 2 / Channel / Verses 3 & 4 / Channel – 2x / Chorus 1 / Chorus 2

Lyrics: Let our praise be Your welcome / Let our songs be the sign / We are here for You, we are here for You Let Your breath come from heaven / Fill our hearts with your life / We are here for You, We are for You To You our hearts are open / Nothing here is hidden / You are our one desire You alone are holy / Only You are worthy / God, let Your fire fall down Let our shout be Your anthem / Your renown fill the skies / We are here for You, we are here for You Let Your Word move in power / Let what’s dead come to life / We are here for You, we are here for You We welcome You with praise / We welcome You with praise / Almighty God of love / Be welcomed in this place Let every heart adore / Let every soul awake / Almighty God of love / Be welcome in this place

Summary: “Here for You” is the title track from this much-anticipated release.  I believe it is meant to be a driving declaration / cry to God to have preeminence in the heart of the worshipper and in the congregation as a whole.  The Passion movement has rallied around a similar desire throughout it’s history.  Their theme is Isaiah 26:8 which says, “Yes, Lord, walking in the way of Your laws, we wait for you; your name and renown are the desire of our hearts.”   (Hence, the 268 generation to which they are commonly referred.) The melody of “Here for You” is very sing-able but the uncharacteristic format could present performance problems for the less seasoned praise team.  I have no doubt this song will be a camp favorite in the summer of 2011.  Yet, I am concerned with the vague nature of the song lyrics.  To me, the song hints of the worshipper telling God when and where He is welcome.  I wonder if it is our place to tell God where He is welcome?  Shouldn’t it be the other way around?  I understand the premise of the song, I just question it’s overall helpfulness in congregational singing.  I predict this title cut will have its season on the worship circuit, but will be overshadowed by the other songs in years to come. (2 out of 5 stars -reviewed by Zach Rice)

2.  SYMPHONY – Sung by Chris Tomlin Writers: Chris Tomlin, Matt Redman, Jason Ingram, Louie Giglio, and Matt Maher Biblical references:  Psalm 148:1, Psalm 33:6-8, Isaiah 29:23 Lead Sheet/Super Chart: available via LifeWayWorship.Com Theme:  A song of praise to God for His creative works. Format – Verse / Chorus / Verse / Chorus / Channel / Chorus / Bridge / Chorus – 3x

Lyrics: Shining wonders, fields of splendor / How they sing Your symphony The deepest oceans, rising mountains / How they sing Your symphony / Let the earth fear the Lord / And all the people of the world / Stand in awe, stand in awe My heart’s ovation, Yours forever / I will sing, sing Your praise Let every nation under heaven / Shout Your name, sing Your praise In symphony with all created things / Sing the song that we were made to sing / Stand in awe, stand in awe All the angels, all the heavens / Every people, every nation / Crying out to You In the skies and in the oceans / Everything that’s living, breathing / A symphony to You There will be no greater song / In the heights above or the earth below / Jesus, all for You

Summary –   In my opinion, “Symphony” is a big upgrade from the opening song “Here for You.”  This song is filled with biblical overtones from Israel’s song book (The Psalms).  The writers have done a good job providing creation imagery and allowing appropriate opportunities for the worshipper to respond to the truth contained in the lyrics.  The specific imagery of creation being like players in a symphony of praise to God is wonderful.  The “stand in awe” chorus section is a great opportunity for the congregation to lift their voices in unison to the Creator of the Universe.  The verses and choruses are congregational friendly but the bridge and channel sections are a little complex.  My one wish for this song is that they would’ve (as Spurgeon says) “made a bee-line to the cross.”  Our God is the Creator of all things but He is also the Redeemer.  This song is useful in congregational worship but could’ve been even more so if it would’ve included both creation and redemption as dual themes.  I liked how they include the name of Jesus toward the culmination of the song.  In my opinion, a lot of modern songwriters rely too heavily on the use of pronouns to refer to God. (3 out of 5 stars – reviewed by Zach Rice)

3.  WAITING HERE FOR YOU – sung by Christy Nockels; Writers: Chris Tomlin, Martin Smith, and Jesse Reeves Biblical references:  Matthew 17:20, Psalm 117:2 Lead Sheet/Super Chart: available via LifeWayWorship.Com Theme:  Desperate prayer of waiting / longing for God Format:  Verses 1 & 2 / Chorus / Verse 3 / Chorus / Bridge – 2x / Chorus – 2x

Lyrics:  If faith can move the mountains / Let the mountains move We come with expectation / Waiting here for You, waiting here for You / You’re the Lord of all creation / And still You know my heart The Author of Salvation / You’ve loved us from the start Waiting here for You / With our hands lifted high in praise And it’s You we adore / Singing Alleluia You are everything You’ve promised / Your faithfulness is true And we’re desperate for Your presence / All we need is You Singing Alleluia / Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

Summary: “Waiting Here For You” is the prayer of one desperately longing for God.  I first have to say that Christy Nockels is my favorite female singer.  She does a great job of taking this simplistic prayer song and making it powerful.  Yet, I continue to be amazed at the cliché nature of the lyrics on this album.  Sure, there is a place for intimate simplistic worship, however, I’ve come to expect more from songs penned by these writers.  The overuse of pronouns for God and vague biblical references are troubling.  I think this song is produced well, sung well, and has a place somewhere.  However, I believe it would be best used in private worship or at the end of a meaty corporate worship set.  I wonder if someone off the street would know to whom the praise is being directed?  “Lord of all creation” and “Author of Salvation” are the only (albeit brief) giveaways.  Don’t get me wrong, I like the song, but I was left wanting more in several departments. (2.5 out of 5 stars – reviewed by Zach Rice)

4. ALL MY FOUNTAINS (review by Dennis C. Cook)

Sung by Chris Tomlin

Written by Nathan Nockels, Daniel Carson, Chris Tomlin, & Christy Nockels

Biblical reference: Psalm 87:6-7 The LORD will write in the register of the peoples: “This one was born in Zion.”  As they make music they will sing, “All my fountains are in you.”

Lead Sheet/Super Chart: available via LifeWayWorship.Com

Theme: Adoration & Praise, Faith & Trust

Format – Verse 1/Verse 2/Chorus/Bridge X 3/Chorus X 2/Tag

Lyrics: VERSE 1-This dry and desert land, I tell myself, “Keep walking on”
Hear something up ahead, Water falling like a song, An everlasting stream,
Your river carries me home, Let it flow, let if flow
VERSE 2-A flood for my soul, A well that never will run dry
I’ve rambled on my own, Never believing I would find An everlasting stream,
Your river carries me home, Let it flow, let it flow
CHORUS-Open the heavens, Come Living Water
All my fountains are in You, You’re strong like a river
Your love is running through, All my fountains are in You
BRIDGE-Come on, and rain down on us, Rain down on us, Lord

Summary – This new praise song from Chris Tomlin (& Company) is track number four from the Passion 2011 release.  After listening to this track several times, my immediate reaction was that this is a song that will be used heavily at youth camps/conferences this summer.

Throughout this upbeat song, Tomlin uses Psalm 87 as a reference as he sings the story of a man walking through the desert, urging himself to “keep walking on” though he is longing for a drink.  Next, the wanderer hears a fountain up ahead which he describes “like a song”.  An energetic chorus, and very “singable” chorus enters after verse two.

God’s love is indeed like a fountain that carries us home to Him.  His Word is what encourages us to keep walking on His path, in the midst of circumstances that are not favorable in the world’s eyes.  His salvation to us is what quenches our thirst in this weary land.

This song could easily be added to a worship set.  For those churches who struggle with format, it could easily be put into verse/chorus/verse/chorus format.  I would implement this with a youth choir or praise band first to introduce the melody to the congregation.  This isn’t a strong worship song (lyrically speaking) for Tomlin.  He has produced much better, Bible-referenced songs.  The lyrics are based on the Psalms, but compared to the more evangelistic song, “I Will Follow”, or new worship song, “Our God”, this is not as strong, lyrically. (3 out of 5 stars for congregational use)

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5. SHADOWS, (review by Dennis C. Cook)

Sung by the David Crowder Band (feat. Lecrae)

Written by David Crowder

Biblical reference: Isaiah 59:9 “So justice is far from us, and righteousness does not reach us. We look for light, but all is darkness; for brightness, but we walk in deep shadows.”

Psalm 23:4 “Even though I walk through the darkest valley, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.” Also 1 Corinthians 1:31, Galations 6:4  and Colossians 2:13-15.

Lead Sheet/Super Chart: LifeWayWorship.com

Theme: perseverance, dedication, testimony, remembrance &

Format : V1/C/V1/C/B/C/C

Lyrics: VERSE ONE – Life is full of light and shadow, O the joy and O the sorrow, O the sorrow
And yet will He bring dark to light, and yet will He bring, day from night
CHORUS – When shadows fall on us, we will not fear, we will remember
When darkness falls on us, we will not fear, we will remember
When all seems lost, when we’re thrown and we’re tossed, we’ll remember the cost
We’re resting in shadow of the cross

BRIDGE/RAP  (text research by Matt Pinkston)–

With every breath I take, with every heart beat,
Sunrise and the moon lights in the dark street.

Every glance, every dance, every note of a song.
It’s all a gift undeserved that I shouldn’t have known.
Every day that I lie, every moment I covet
I’m deserving to die, I’m just earning your judgment.
I, without the cross there’s only condemnation.
If Jesus wasn’t executed there’s no celebration.
So in times that are good, in times that are bad
For any times that I’ve had it all I will be glad.
and I will boast in the cross. I boast in my pains.
I will boast in the sonshine, boast in his reign.
What’s my life if it’s not praising you.
Another dollar in my bank account of vain pursuit. I do.
That count my life as any value or presence at all.
Let me finish my race, let me answer my call.

Summary – The David Crowder Band is not your typical mainstream Christian group.  Many of their songs are not used in the local church in worship, though they are hugly popular on iTunes and major Christian radio markets.  But, recently two song arrangements have made their way in to choir anthems and worship services: O Praise Him and How He Loves.

This song is emotional.  The powerful and haunting melody is a perfect marriage with the text.  The verse is not as singable as the chorus, but has a place in worship.  Too many times, churches forget to use songs of reflection, the darkness surrounding the cross and the price that was paid.

The Lecrae rap is gaining a LOT of attention.  Possibly for its use on the album, more hopefully – and more importantly – for the amazing passion he gives to the text.  The hard hitting lyrics are amazing and should be read closely while listening to the song, if clarity is needed.

This song is not that congregational-friendly in the local rural church.  But there are other ways to worship with this song: praise band (minus the rap), youth choir (with or without the rap), creative ministry, or a background song for a slideshow or worship video.

(1 out of 5 stars for congregational use as recorded)

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6. LORD, I NEED YOU, (review by Dennis C. Cook)

Sung by Chris Tomlin

Written by Daniel Carson, Matt Maher, Christy Nockels, Jesse Reeves and Kristian Stanfill

Biblical reference: 1 Corinthians 1:30 , 1 Corinthians 15:19 & Psalm 35:23

Lead Sheet/Super Chart: LifeWayWorship.com & Praisecharts.com

Theme:  His guidance, care, assurance, comfort, mercy and grace

Format : V1/C/V2/C/B/C

Lyrics: VERSE 1: Lord I come, I confess, bowing here I find my rest
Without You I fall apart, You’re the one that guides my heart
CHORUS: Lord, I need You, oh I need You, every hour I need You
My one defense, my righteousness, oh God, how I need You
VERSE 2: Where sin runs deep, Your grace is more,
where grace is found is where You are, and where You are Lord I am free
Holiness is Christ in me, yes where You are Lord I am free, holiness is Christ in me
BRIDGE: So teach my song to rise to You, when temptation comes my way
And when I cannot stand I’ll fall on You, Jesus You’re my hope and stay
And when I cannot stand I’ll fall on You, Jesus You’re my hope and stay

Summary – In great typical Chris Tomlin fashion, he gives the church another scripturally-structured song to sing.  As an added bonus, Tomlin and the other writers pull from the hymn “I Need Thee Every Hour” (Hawks/Lowry).  Matching old to new songs helps to bridge the gap of generations in worship.

Moreover, this song can easily omit the bridge and be sung in a typical hymn format of verse/chorus/verse/chorus to lessen the amount to teach to the congregation.

(4 out of 5 stars for congregational use as recorded – 5 out of 5 if you omit the bridge)

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7.  SET FREE

Sung by: Chris Tomlin and Matt Redman

Written by: Matt Redman, Ben Fielding, Jason Ingram, & Chris Tomlin

Biblical References: 2 Corinthians 3:17, Psalm 149:3, Galatians 5:1, etc

Super Chart: available via www.lifewayworship.com

Format: Verse 1 / Chorus / Verse 2 / Chorus / Bridge – 2x / Chorus – 2x / Bridge – 2x

Lyrics:

Joy, joy, unspeakable joy / Hope like never before / You came for us / You are our freedom

Love, love, unshakeable love / We shall overcome, we will never give up

We lift a shout, we lift a shout / Everyone singing

Come on, come on now, we’ve got a new song

Come on, come on now, a song of liberty

Let the world hear heaven’s melody

This is the shout of the hearts You’ve set free

True, true we know it’s true / We stand now, risen with You

You lifted us, You are our freedom / Strong, strong, whatever may come

You have already won / We lift a shout, we lift a shout / Everyone singing

And we’ll dance, dance / Dance in Your freedom

Oh, Your glorious freedom / Forevermore, forevermore

Summary: Set Free is an energetic song that I believe will be very popular amongst youth and college age folks.  The themes in the song are biblical, such as joy, love, hope, freedom in Christ, etc.  I know I am beating a dead horse here, but I think the overuse of pronouns (“YOU” in this case) is a real issue for congregational worship.  I hesitate to get into grammar here (given my weaknesses in this area), but here goes.  When writing a paragraph about someone, you need to identify who you are talking about.   After declaring who you are speaking about, the writer is free to use pronouns (he, she, you, etc) for the next few sentences.  I am not suggesting that song writing has to follow strict grammatical rules, but I do believe that somewhere in the song, it is important to directly name who you are speaking of.  To emphasize my point, I once sang a song of love and devotion to God and afterward several ladies in the audience told me how sweet it was that I sang that “beautiful song to my fiancé!”   As worship leaders, we must be mindful not to simply pick fun songs, but songs of real substance.  Every song doesn’t have to be a theological masterpiece, but the Object of our worship should be clear.  Vague lyrics can lead us down the road of worshipping worship, rather than worshipping Christ!  All in all, Set Free is a fun song to listen to, but I probably wouldn’t use it in worship as it is currently constructed.

(2.5 out of 5 stars for congregational use – reviewed by Zach Rice)

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8.  FOREVER REIGN

Sung by: Kristian Stanfill

Written by: Reuben Morgan & Jason Ingram

Biblical References: Ephesians 2:6-7, John 8:12, Psalm 16:2, 1 Cor. 15:55, etc

Super Chart: available via www.lifewayworship.com

Format: Verse 1 & 2 / Chorus / Verse 3 / Chorus – 2x / Bridge – 2x / Chorus – 2x / Tag

Lyrics:
You are good, You are good / When there’s nothing good in me
You are love, You are love / On display for all to see
You are light, You are light / When the darkness closes in
You are hope, You are hope / You have covered all my sin

You are peace, You are peace / When my fear is crippling
You are true, You are true / Even in my wandering
You are joy, You are joy / You’re the reason that I sing
You are life, You are life / In You death has lost its sting

Oh, I’m running to your arms /I’m running to arms
The riches of your love / Will always be enough
Nothing compares to Your embrace / Light of the world forever reign

You are more, You are more / Than my words will ever say
You are Lord, You are Lord / All creation will proclaim
You are here, You are here /In your presence I’m made whole
You are God, You are God / Of all else I’m letting go

My heart will sing / no other name / Jesus, Jesus

Summary: As I listened to Forever Reign the first few times, I thought to myself, “I’ve heard this song somewhere before.”  Later I realized it was on the 2010 Hillsong Live hit album, A Beautiful Exchange.  I found it odd that Passion would include this song on this project.  However, I believe this song was included for two main reasons.  1) It was co-written by Jason Ingram, who co-wrote other songs on the project.  2) It is simply a great song!

I like Forever Reign for many reasons.  It has a memorable and sing-able melody.  It’s a song that I believe people will want to sing because of its combination of good lyrics, energetic music, and interesting melody.  It is theologically sound, but not too wordy.  It simply conveys important truths about God such as His goodness, love, nearness, glory, eternality, etc.  The song builds to a climax as the worshipper is provided the opportunity to respond to God by singing the bridge: My heart will sing no other name, JESUS!  JESUS!” I would not cut out the bridge to make it more conducive for traditional settings; since it is too vital to the rest of the song. Forever Reign is a song worth trying with your congregation, especially if you lead with a band.

(4 out of 5 stars for congregational use – reviewed by Zach Rice)

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9.  SOMETIMES

Sung by: David Crowder Band

Written by: David Crowder

Biblical References: Malachi 4:2, Isaiah 6:8, ???

Super Chart: available via www.lifewayworship.com

Format: Verse 1 / Channel / Chorus / Verse 2 / Channel / Chorus / Bridge – 2x / Channel – 2x / Chorus / Tag

Lyrics: Sometimes every one of us feels / Like we’ll never be healed / Sometimes

Sometimes everyone of us aches / Like we’ll never be saved / Sometimes

When we’ve given up / Let Your healing come / When there’s nothing left

Let Your healing come / ‘Til we’re rising up / Let Your healing come

Where You go, we will follow / Where You go, we will follow

It’s Your love that we adore / It’s like a sea without a shore / We’re lost in You, we’re lost in You

It’s Your love that we adore / It’s like a sea without a shore / We’re lost in You, we’re lost in You

Sometimes

Sometimes / It’s like we’ll never atone / For all the love we’ve known / Sometimes

Like in a smile or a song / When you feel it come / And that feeling’s gone / It flies

When we’ve given up / Let Your healing come / When there’s nothing left

Let Your healing come / Feel it rise up / Let Your healing come

Where You go, we will follow / Where You go, we will follow

It’s Your love that love that we adore / It’s like a sea without a shore

We’re lost in You / We’re lost in You

It’s Your love that love that we adore / It’s like a sea without a shore

We’re lost in You / We’re lost in You

It’s Your love that we adore / It’s like a sea without a shore

Don’t be afraid / Don’t be afraid / Just set your sail

And risk the ocean there’s only grace / Let’s risk the ocean there’s only grace

Let’s risk the ocean there’s only grace / Let’s risk the ocean there’s only grace

Where You go, we will follow / I’m on my knees

Where You go, we will follow / Oh, God send me

Summary: I’m not a huge fan of Sometimes.  I personally wouldn’t select it for use in a corporate worship service.  Although it is most likely meant to be a declaration of surrender to God, I feel it is simply too weak in the Scripture department.  I believe we must choose songs that are oozing with the Word of God, not just an occasional reference here and there.  I believe worship leading is as much a teaching /counseling ministry as it is anything.  The people in our pews have real problems, real struggles, and real needs.  With that in mind, our people must come face to face with the Word of God in worship.  Getting “lost” in a state of worship will not change anyone, but encountering the TRUE and LIVING GOD in His Word will!  I assume that the latter is what Crowder meant, but the fuzzy lyrics are problematic for me.  Crowder brings up some good thoughts in the song, but he doesn’t really give the needed biblical support to flesh out those thoughts.  We need to be transformed, comforted, and challenged by the power of God as revealed in His Word.  This only happens when we sing the Word, preach the Word, teach the Word, etc.  Sometimes is in my estimation – repetitious, vague, and not easy to follow (musically or lyrically).

(1.5 out of 5 stars for congregational use – reviewed by Zach Rice)
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10.  ALWAYS, by Kristian Stanfill (review by Dennis C. Cook)

Written by: Jason Ingram and Kristian Stanfill

Biblical reference: Psalm 23:4, Psalm 121, Psalm 46:1

Lead Sheet/Super Chart: lifewayworship.com & worshiptogether.com

Theme: Deliverance, faithfulness, protector, rest and guidance

Format: V1/C/V2/C/B/C/B

Lyrics: VERSE ONE-My foes are many, they rise against me

But I will hold my ground

I will not fear the war, I will not fear the storm

My help is on the way, my help is on the way

CHORUS – Oh, my God, He will not delay

My refuge and strength always

I will not fear, His promise is true

My God will come through always, always

VERSE TWO – Troubles surround me, chaos abounding

My soul will rest in You

I will not fear the war, I will not fear the storm

My help is on the way, my help is on the way

BRIDGE – I lift my eyes up, my help comes from the Lord (4x)

From You Lord, from You Lord

Summary – Jason Ingram and Kristian Stanfill have collaborated on a worship song that was first released on Stanfill’s “Mountains Move” album.  Stanfill prays this song bring much hope to the listener and focuses the listener’s attention on Christ to help them through trials.  These lyrics are solid.  “Always” is based from three passages from the Psalms but mainly roots itself in Psalm 121.  We all go through trials and tribulations and seek help.  This song is a nice addition

The song is basic, musically speaking.  The chord structure is typical, but the melody is very singable for a soloist, choir, or congregation.  As I was researching this song, I could hear a soloist opening up on the verse and the choir coming in on the chorus.  Lost of worship use potential with “Always” and it is one of the more congregation-friendly songs on the album.

(4 out of 5 stars for congregational use)

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11.  Carry Your Name, by Christy Nockels (review by Dennis C. Cook)

Written by: Words and Music by Jason Ingram, Christy Nockels, Nathan Nockels and Chris Tomlin

Biblical reference: John 15:13, Philippians 2:9-10 & Isaiah 53:5

Lead Sheet/Super Chart: lifewayworship.com & worshiptogether.com

Theme: Praise, Commitment and Dedication

Format: V1 / C1 / V2 / C1 / C2 / C2 / C1 / C2

Lyrics: Verse 1 – How merciful the cross, how powerful the blood, how beautiful Your arms open for us, open for us

Chorus 1 – No greater love, God’s only Son, Jesus, Jesus.  No other name, mighty to save, Jesus, Jesus

Verse 2 – By Your wounds we are healed and You have conquered the grave and in Your rising, we will rise, to carry Your name above every name

Chorus 2 – I will carry Your name, carry Your name, Jesus, Your name forever, for all of my days

in all of my ways Jesus, Your name forever

Summary – Remember, as we review this, we are reviewing from the standpoint of using this material in the local church.  This song can be sung in any church.  It is very repetitive and easy to learn.  Lyrically, I struggle with the general weakness of the entire song.  Short phrases put together do not equal a good lyric…decent lyric, for that matter.  The lyrics of this song are so weak, I would not feel comfortable singing it in our worship services.  I “get” the overall theme of the song, but when we compare these lyrics to the stronger lyric of something like “The Power of the Cross” there is no comparison.

“Oh to see the dawn of the darkest day, Christ on the road to calvary, tried by sinful men, torn and beaten then, nailed to a cross of wood.  This the pow’r of the cross, Christ became sin for us, took the blame, bore the wrath, we  stand forgiven at the cross.”

If the lyric was stronger, I would rate this song a little higher, but the different names of Christ are almost overused on this recording.  Take that last phrase in the manner it was intended.  We could never praise God enough.  We will never praise Him enough.  We should never cease in attempting to praise Him.  But, if all of our songs are only short, bland phrases, and the names of God, where is there room for us to grow as Christians and use these songs as a tool for outreach?  To echo our ChurchMusicToday contributor, Zach Rice, “… I continue to be amazed at the cliché nature of the lyrics on this album.  Sure, there is a place for intimate simplistic worship, however, I’ve come to expect more from songs penned by these writers.  The overuse of pronouns for God and vague biblical references are troubling.”

(2.5 out of 5 stars for congregational use)

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12.  Spirit Fall, by Chris Tomlin (review by Dennis C. Cook)

Written by: Words and Music by Daniel Carson, Louie Giglio, Jason Ingram and Kristian Stanfill

Biblical reference: Luke 3:16, 1 John 4:14, Joel 2:28  & Colossians 1:27

Lead Sheet/Super Chart: lifewayworship.com & worshiptogether.com

Theme: Holy Spirit, guidance, revival, and Trinity

Format: V1 / C1 / C1 / C1 / C1 / R / R / R / C2 / C2 / R / R / C2 / C2 / C2 / C2 / V1 / V1 / R / R / C2 / C2

Lyrics: Verse 1 – Spirit fall, Spirit fall, Holy Spirit fall, fall on me

Chorus 1 – Like a mighty wind, light the fire again, come and breathe Your breath on me

Refrain Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh

Chorus 2 – Oh, come, magnify the Son, Savior of the world, the hope for everyone

Summary – for over seven minutes, Chris Tomlin uses this song as the last song on the regular edition Passion album.  I like the idea of using the Holy Spirit to come into the worship service and lead, guide, and dwell among the worshippers.  We should pray that the Holy Spirit leads every aspect of worship.  But, this song will not go over well in the local church. It is too long, too repetitive, weak in lyric structure, and lack of cohesiveness (just look at the format).  This theme has great potential.  But, it seems like a lyrics were forced into a band arrangement instead of a melody being birthed out of a lyric.

(1.5 out of 5 stars for congregational use)


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5 thoughts on “CD REVIEW: Passion “Here For You”

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